Menu

Illinois Criminal Code of 1961

Article 29: Illinois Bribery Law

Bribery can be a serious offense with severe consequences, and Illinois lawmakers do their best to prevent it in this section of Article 29 of the Illinois Criminal Code. If someone offers any sort of bribe to professional or college athletes in order to influence the outcome of a competition, he or she could be found guilty of offering a bribe. Depending on the nature of the bribe, a violation is either a Class A misdemeanor or a Class 4 felony.

It is also illegal under Illinois law to accept a bribe. If an athlete agrees to take a bribe in return for not using his best efforts in a competition, that person could be found guilty of a Class 4 felony. Lastly, the section of Illinois criminal law mandates that anyone involved with an athletic event who is offered a bribe must report it to their employer or to the police. Failure to report offer of a bribe is a Class A misdemeanor.

Need an Illinois criminal defense attorney? If you've been arrested for bribery in Illinois, call our Chicago criminal defense attorneys today at (312) 466-9466 to discuss your case.

The text below comes from Article 29 of the Illinois Criminal Code of 1961. This law may have changed -- please read the important legal disclaimer at the bottom of this page.

Illinois Criminal Code of 1961 - Article 29

Sec. 29-1. Offering a bribe.
    (720 ILCS 5/29-1)

(a) Any person who, with intent to influence any person participating in, officiating or connected with any professional or amateur athletic contest, sporting event or exhibition, gives, offers or promises any money, bribe or other thing of value or advantage to induce such participant, official or other person not to use his best efforts in connection with such contest, event or exhibition commits a Class 4 felony.

(b) Any person who, with the intent to influence the decision of any individual, offers or promises any money, bribe or other thing of value or advantage to induce such individual to attend, refrain from attending or continue to attend a particular public or private institution of secondary education or higher education for the purpose of participating or not participating in interscholastic athletic competition for such institution commits a Class A misdemeanor. This Section does not apply to the: (1) offering or awarding to an individual any type of scholarship, grant or other bona fide financial aid or employment; (2) offering of any type of financial assistance by such individual's family; or (3) offering of any item of de minimis value by such institution's authorities if such item is of the nature of an item that is commonly provided to any or all students or prospective students.

(c) Any person who gives any money, goods or other thing of value to an individual enrolled in an institution of higher education who participates in interscholastic competition and represents or attempts to represent such individual in future negotiations for employment with any professional sports team commits a Class A misdemeanor. (Source: P.A. 85-665.)

Sec. 29-2. Accepting a bribe.
    (720 ILCS 5/29-2)

Any person participating in, officiating or connected with any professional or amateur athletic contest, sporting event or exhibition who accepts or agrees to accept any money, bribe or other thing of value or advantage with the intent, understanding or agreement that he will not use his best efforts in connection with such contest, event or exhibition commits a Class 4 felony. (Source: P. A. 77-2638.)

Sec. 29-3. Failure to report offer of bribe.
    (720 ILCS 5/29-3)

Any person participating, officiating or connected with any professional or amateur athletic contest, sporting event or exhibition who fails to report forthwith to his employer, the promoter of such contest, event or exhibition, a peace officer, or the local State's Attorney any offer or promise made to him in violation of Section 29-1 commits a Class A misdemeanor. (Source: P. A. 77-2638.)

   Return to Illinois Criminal Code of 1961 Table of Contents

DISCLAIMER: These excerpts from the law are provided for reference purposes only. Visitors to our Chicago criminal defense lawyer website should be aware that Illinois criminal laws have been amended many times and that Illinois crime laws posted on this site may not be current. In addition, Illinois criminal case law defines precedents for legal determinations that are not defined in the original laws.

Chicago Criminal Defense Lawyer - (312) 466-9466 

Chicago Office

900 W. Jackson Blvd.

Suite 5W

Chicago, IL 60607

Map & Contact Info